Successful Reentry

Interaction with the criminal legal system can keep people from being able to advance economically. People who have served that time should be free.

Interaction with the criminal legal system can keep people from being able to advance economically by limiting their ability to access housing, employment, and even educational opportunities. Incarceration reduces earning power. These systemic issues and discriminatory policies effectively serve to make justice-involved individuals permanent second-class citizens. We advocate for policies that help people who are justice-involved secure stable jobs, finish their education, and thrive in their communities.

Support Our Work

Our Insights

Electronic monitoring is incarceration by another name.

Access to safe, fair, affordable housing is key to reentry.

Our Impact

Legislators unanimously pass law after hearing from justice-involved individuals, community members, and advocates from the Shriver Center.

Resources

Feb 2015

Overly restrictive housing admissions policies create barriers to housing for individuals with criminal records.

Attorneys and Specialists

Patrice James
Patrice James
Patrice James
Director of Community Justice

312.368.2001

Tanya Gassenheimer
Tanya Gassenheimer
Tanya Gassenheimer
Staff Attorney

312.854.3384

Verónica Cortez
Verónica Cortez
Verónica Cortez
Staff Attorney

312.854.3374

Kate Walz
Kate Walz
Kate Walz
Vice President of Advocacy, Senior Director of Litigation, & Director of Housing Justice

312.368.2679

Emily Coffey
Emily Coffey
Emily Coffey
Staff Attorney, Housing Justice, Goldberg Kohn Foundation/Fred Cohen Fellow

312.724.8411

Tex Pasley
Tex Pasley
Tex Pasley
University of Virginia Powell Fellow in Legal Services

312.549.9877

Henry Shah
Henry Shah
Henry Shah
Advocacy Program Associate

312.368.1033

Marie Claire Tran-Leung
Marie Claire Tran-Leung
Marie Claire Tran-Leung
Senior Attorney

312.754.9450

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