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Maximizing the Power of Geographic Information Systems in Racial Justice

By Allan M. Parnell & Ann Moss Joyner

Maps and graphs can help lawyers, judges, and juries understand data that would normally intimidate them. Geographic information systems (GIS) formats can be used to display empirical spatial information. Because discrimination cases often have a spatial element, GIS is on target for advocates working toward racial justice. An accompanying sidebar by Jason Reece describes "The Geography of Justice."

Editor's Note: As a benefit to our readers, below are full-color versions of the images presented in Ann Moss Joyner and Allan Parnell's Maximizing the Power of Geographic Information Systems in Racial Justice.

  1. The effect of annexation: Modesto city limits and Hispanic Residents, 1961.
  2. The effect of annexation: city limits and Hispanic Residents, 2004.
  3. Access to streetlights and municipal exclusion.
  4. Access to streetlights and municipal exclusion.
  5. Access to water and race.
  6. Coal Run and water: the importance of context.
  7. Zoning and race or ethnicity in Dallas, Texas.
  8. Location of landfill in relation to African American residents of Brunswick County, North Carolina.
  9. Concentration of population near proposed landfill by African American percentages.
  10. Concentration of population near proposed landfill by race.
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