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Urban Agriculture Takes Root

By William Kraus

As Detroit's population has fallen to less than half the number of residents it had fifty years ago, urban agriculture is giving hope to a battered city. Community gardens offer physical and mental health benefits, job training, and environmental improvements as they help residents come together and put abandoned land to good use. Advocates can help low-income communities launch urban agriculture by advising on land-use questions and helping community groups negotiate purchase, leasing, or licensing of public land.

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