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People with Criminal Records

Resisting Practices that Undermine Self-Sufficiency, Public Safety, and Balanced Budgets

By Todd Belcore

People with criminal records face lifelong exclusion from many employment opportunities, and this increases recidivism rates. Employment barriers harm not just men and women with criminal records but their families, communities, and even their states, where skyrocketing rates of incarceration, disproportionately of people of color, contribute to budget deficits. Recent Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidance explains how the disparate impact of denying employment to people with criminal records may violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. The Fair Credit Reporting Act offers additional protections; state and local policies can also help expand access to employment for people with criminal records.

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